Demand for Cloud Technologies

Those who have skills and experience with cloud technologies are going to be much in demand in the next few years. According to Tech.Co, the use of cloud computing technologies is expected to quadruple in the near future. Estimates are that cloud data centers will manage a whopping 92 percent of all workloads.

So who are the biggest contributors to this massive progression to the cloud? The biggest players are the IoT (internet of things) and big data centers. Most of the growth will occur in public cloud data centers, with the use of private clouds beginning to decline. Interestingly, predictions are that infrastructure as a service (IaaS) will decline somewhat, due to many organizations focusing on improving their own corporate infrastructures, including both data storage for sensitive information and acquisition of their own high-speed connections.

In addition, a recent study, “2017 Cloud Computing and Business Intelligence Market Study” conducted by Dresner Advisory Services, notes that as organizations are turning to public clouds, they are also looking for cloud-based business intelligence tools such as dashboards, advanced visualization tools, ad hoc queries, data integration and data quality, end-user self-service and reporting features. The study goes on to note the trend for increasing demand for cloud-based BI services, is largely driven by smaller organizations. However, not included in their across the board “must have” list for BI services, is social media or streaming analytics, although these are still important in certain industries.

Trust in the cloud is not just increasing for businesses. Consumers are also expected to demand more from the cloud. Estimates are that personal cloud storage will increase from 47 to 59 percent. That may not sound like a huge percentage increase, but globally the increase represents about a billion more users.

The future looks bright in the cloud, supported by both business and consumer demand. Anyone interested in applying their technology skills to this trend will most likely have a bright future as well.

IBM Power Systems Benefits

IBM Power Systems provides one of the leading IT management systems in the market. In the past, it was primarily focused on simply running a smooth operating system and solving key problems. However today it has migrated to new applications. In particular, the IBM Power Systems Linux based servers, called the OpenPOWER LC servers, are a hardware solution that many managers will find intriguing.

IBM Power Systems

Speed and Storage

OpenPOWER LC servers have two key benefits. The first is simply the speed and storage capabilities. The key specs are:

  • Up to 20 cores (2.9-3.3Ghz)
  • 2 sockets
  • 512 GB memory (16 DIMMs)
  • 115 GB/sec max sustained memory bandwidth
  • 12 3.5” SATA drives, 96 TB storage
  • 5 PCIe slots, 2 CAPI enabled
  • 2 Nvidia K80 GPU capable

That means that the analytical and big data capabilities are off the chart. In fact, MongoDB runs twice as fast and EDB Postgress runs 1.8 times as fast on the system.

Companies are dealing with more complex problems that require even more power than ever before. Firms are dealing with analytics issues such as supply chain optimization, agile asset management, fraud prevention and enterprise data management that only can be handled with a powerful big data server like the OpenPOWER LC.

Integration

The second benefit is that the server integrates nicely with existing data systems and other servers. This product is fully compatible to be plugged right into a server farm. There is no need to do extensive customization or back-end fixes.  Instead, IT managers can add it into the existing stock as a powerful new tool.

COMMON is a leading organization helping Power Systems professionals through educational events, certification, and ongoing training. For more information, please visit our website.

What Is Software Defined Storage?

One of the major trends in IT storage today is the accelerating growth of software defined storage (SDS). According to market research firm MarketsandMarkets, the market for SDS products will grow from $4.72 billion in 2016 to $22.56 billion by 2021. That’s an outstanding compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 36.7%.

But many IT leaders, even storage professionals, remain unsure of exactly what the term SDS really signifies.

Actually, that confusion is not surprising. As with many new technologies that begin to expand their market share, some storage vendors have taken the opportunity to break out the software component of existing products and call it SDS. And, of course, their definition of SDS just happens to precisely match the feature set of the product they are trying to sell.

Contrary to what some skeptics claim, however, SDS is much more than just the latest marketing buzzword. In fact, many proponents see it as the vanguard of a revolutionary advance in how enterprise storage is managed and delivered.

SDS Defined

The Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) defines SDS as “virtualized storage with a service management interface.”

Although storage virtualization has been in use for some time, SDS takes it to a new level. The distinctive feature of SDS is the decoupling of the intelligence of the storage system from the underlying hardware. This means SDS is storage-agnostic – it isn’t tied to any particular type of hardware or media. Instead it treats all the devices it controls, whether spinning disks, flash memory arrays, or even entire SAN or NAS subsystems, as part of a single storage pool. Users and applications (via standard APIs) can access storage through a consistent software interface without needing to have any knowledge of what hardware is actually storing the data.

One of the major benefits of the storage heterogeneity SDS allows is that costly special-designed storage appliances are not required (though, of course, they can be used if desired). Instead, inexpensive commodity hard drives attached to x86 hosts can be used, mixed in with higher performance technologies such as flash memory arrays as necessary. The SDS software has the intelligence to use tiering and caching functions to dynamically assign particular sets of data to the appropriate storage devices based on the performance demands of the workload being run.

The result of hiding all the storage hardware behind the SDS software interface is that flexibility, scalability, and control are maximized, while costs for hardware, maintenance, and storage management are minimized.

The Move to Cloud Storage is Gathering Steam

Both large enterprises and smaller companies are well into a process of transitioning their data storage from on-premises data centers to the cloud. The advantages of cloud-based IT storage are compelling.

Advantages

First, cloud storage relieves a company of the necessity of up-front capital spending to purchase storage hardware. Cloud storage vendors store the data in their own remote data centers and charge a monthly fee for just the amount of storage a customer actually uses in that billing period.

Another advantage is that good cloud storage providers are experts in data management, data security, backups and disaster recovery. This takes a tremendous load off a customer’s in-house IT staff, which can then devote its attention to issues that are more focused on the company’s core businesses.

Concerns

One of the major concerns many IT managers have about moving to the cloud is the security of their data when it resides in someone else’s facilities. But that concern is being alleviated by two factors.

The first is that due to the nature of their business, cloud storage providers are necessarily extremely competent at protecting their clients’ data, and can usually do a better job of it than all but the largest companies can do on their own.

The second factor that mitigates concern about using cloud storage is that it’s not an all-or-nothing proposition. Many companies have settled on a hybrid solution that keeps their most business-critical data at home in their own data centers, while farming out less sensitive data to a cloud storage provider. Many times a cloud storage vendor actually implements and manages a private cloud on the customer’s premises. A survey by 451 Research indicates that by the end of 2014, 39 percent of enterprises had already moved to a hybrid solution.

Outlook

In 2015 spending by hardware manufacturers such as IBM on equipment destined for use in cloud data centers grew by 22 percent to almost $29 billion. According to IDC, spending on cloud infrastructure is expected to reach $37.5 billion by 2020.

As they become more familiar with the advantages of cloud computing, companies big and small are deciding that the cloud should be an integral part of their data storage infrastructure.

Cloud