Study Shows IBM i Has Big Cost Advantage Over Alternatives

According to an August 2017 study conducted by Quark + Lepton, an independent research and management consulting firm, IBM i on Power Systems servers provides a substantial TCO (total cost of ownership) advantage over equivalent Windows or Linux platforms.

For the study, which was funded by IBM, Quark + Lepton used three different server/database configurations: an IBM Power Systems server running IBM i Operating System V7.3 with DB2, an x86 server running Windows Server 2016 and SQL Server 2016 and an x86 with Linux and Oracle Database 12c. TCO estimates were based on the costs of hardware acquisition and maintenance, OS and database licenses and support, system and database admin personnel salaries and facilities expenses. Several different use cases were analyzed.

A Big TCO Advantage

The results of the study showed the projected three-year TCO for the three setups to be as follows:

  • Power Systems/IBM i/DB2 – $430,815
  • x86/Windows/SQL Server – $1.18 million
  • x86/Linux/Oracle – $1.27 million

The study concludes that “costs for use of IBM i on Power Systems are lower across the board”. For example, initial hardware and software acquisition costs for the IBM i systems averaged 8% less than the Windows systems, and fully 24 % less than the Linux systems.

Perhaps the most surprising factor in the stark differential between the IBM i solution and the others was in the cost of required support staff. Based on a 300-user scenario, IBM i required 0.3 FTE (full time equivalent) support personnel, compared to 0.5 FTE for the Windows setup and 0.55 FTE for Linux.

But the biggest differential in staff costs arose from the fact that IBM i admins could handle both the OS and the database. Those double-duty IBM i personnel commanded salaries of about $86,000, while Windows and Linux sysadmins were paid $71,564 and $86,843 respectively. However, the Windows and Linux setups also required the support of separate database admins, adding $100,699 (SQL Server) and $103,283 (Oracle) to the personnel costs for those solutions.

Simplicity

In its conclusion the report notes that while the industry is trending toward ever-greater complexity, the simplicity of IBM i makes it by far the most cost-effective platform on which to base an organization’s IT infrastructure.

IBM Power Systems Benefits

IBM Power Systems provides one of the leading IT management systems in the market. In the past, it was primarily focused on simply running a smooth operating system and solving key problems. However today it has migrated to new applications. In particular, the IBM Power Systems Linux based servers, called the OpenPOWER LC servers, are a hardware solution that many managers will find intriguing.

IBM Power Systems

Speed and Storage

OpenPOWER LC servers have two key benefits. The first is simply the speed and storage capabilities. The key specs are:

  • Up to 20 cores (2.9-3.3Ghz)
  • 2 sockets
  • 512 GB memory (16 DIMMs)
  • 115 GB/sec max sustained memory bandwidth
  • 12 3.5” SATA drives, 96 TB storage
  • 5 PCIe slots, 2 CAPI enabled
  • 2 Nvidia K80 GPU capable

That means that the analytical and big data capabilities are off the chart. In fact, MongoDB runs twice as fast and EDB Postgress runs 1.8 times as fast on the system.

Companies are dealing with more complex problems that require even more power than ever before. Firms are dealing with analytics issues such as supply chain optimization, agile asset management, fraud prevention and enterprise data management that only can be handled with a powerful big data server like the OpenPOWER LC.

Integration

The second benefit is that the server integrates nicely with existing data systems and other servers. This product is fully compatible to be plugged right into a server farm. There is no need to do extensive customization or back-end fixes.  Instead, IT managers can add it into the existing stock as a powerful new tool.

COMMON is a leading organization helping Power Systems professionals through educational events, certification, and ongoing training. For more information, please visit our website.

How IBM Power Systems Are Challenging x86 Servers in the Corporate Data Center

Intel’s x86 architecture has long been dominant in the corporate server marketplace for good reason. Chips based on the x86 framework have been at the heart of personal computers and other devices for more than three decades, and a standardized, widely adopted infrastructure for development and support of x86-based products is in place. The head start x86 enjoys over any potential challengers is immense.

But that hasn’t stopped IBM from joining the fray.

In 2014, IBM sold its x86 server business to Lenovo and pinned its hopes for increasing its penetration of the enterprise and cloud server markets on its upgraded Power Systems line. At that time the consensus in the media and among competitors was that IBM’s efforts would be too little, too late. Intel’s x86 standard was simply too well entrenched to be displaced.

But that assessment is beginning to change. Servers based on the company’s Power8 RISC processor seem to be gathering momentum in the marketplace. In 2015, IBM’s financial results revealed that it had enjoyed revenue growth in its Power Systems line for the first time in four years.

Key to that growth, say analysts, was IBM’s decision to add Linux as an alternative to its proprietary AIX operating system. There are now thousands of ISVs (independent software vendors) developing new Power8 Linux applications or working to port existing x86-based Linux applications to the Power environment. And, IBM claims, it has demonstrated some very good reasons for its customers to do exactly that.

In a June, 2015 conference presentation, the company revealed certified benchmark test results showing that Power8 servers significantly outperformed x86 servers in running financial workloads. In fact, an IBM Power System 824 server more than doubled the performance of a best-in-class x86 machine.

Says Terry Keene, CEO of Integration Systems, LLC,

“Comparing the x86 and Power processors on a micro-benchmark level will show little raw performance advantages for either. Comparing the two using enterprise workloads will demonstrate a significant advantage for Power in data workloads such as databases, data warehouses, data transaction processing, data encryption/compression, and certainly in high-performance computing.”

IBM is aggressively pursuing its objective of gaining a double-digit share of the server market by 2020. And with its even more powerful Power9 chips due out in 2017, the company seems well positioned to reach that goal.