Demand for Cloud Technologies

Those who have skills and experience with cloud technologies are going to be much in demand in the next few years. According to Tech.Co, the use of cloud computing technologies is expected to quadruple in the near future. Estimates are that cloud data centers will manage a whopping 92 percent of all workloads.

So who are the biggest contributors to this massive progression to the cloud? The biggest players are the IoT (internet of things) and big data centers. Most of the growth will occur in public cloud data centers, with the use of private clouds beginning to decline. Interestingly, predictions are that infrastructure as a service (IaaS) will decline somewhat, due to many organizations focusing on improving their own corporate infrastructures, including both data storage for sensitive information and acquisition of their own high-speed connections.

In addition, a recent study, “2017 Cloud Computing and Business Intelligence Market Study” conducted by Dresner Advisory Services, notes that as organizations are turning to public clouds, they are also looking for cloud-based business intelligence tools such as dashboards, advanced visualization tools, ad hoc queries, data integration and data quality, end-user self-service and reporting features. The study goes on to note the trend for increasing demand for cloud-based BI services, is largely driven by smaller organizations. However, not included in their across the board “must have” list for BI services, is social media or streaming analytics, although these are still important in certain industries.

Trust in the cloud is not just increasing for businesses. Consumers are also expected to demand more from the cloud. Estimates are that personal cloud storage will increase from 47 to 59 percent. That may not sound like a huge percentage increase, but globally the increase represents about a billion more users.

The future looks bright in the cloud, supported by both business and consumer demand. Anyone interested in applying their technology skills to this trend will most likely have a bright future as well.

Public vs Private Cloud Technologies

Both public and private cloud hosting solutions greatly benefit any growing business requiring expansion capabilities. Leveraging this technology is key to improving many aspects of your business strategy including revenue growth and employee morale, but the debate continues as to which is superior. Thus, the beauty is in the eye of the user. Choose the one that’s the most pertinent to your company’s needs. If you’re having trouble deciding, here are some comparative features to help you make a more informed decision.

Public Cloud

The public cloud is an environment containing multiple users whereby each user purchases their own piece of the cloud server. The commune of the cloud computing world, public clouds are convenient in that they rarely require any type of contract and generally run pay by the hour services. Also a perk for some, public clouds are self managed, giving the user the freedom to set up and manage their own particulars.

The drawbacks, however, generally pertain to security. The public cloud provider customarily designates the hardware and network your virtual server relies on. Because other users in the cloud also share these facets, compliance requirements such as SOX or PCI are rarely possible. Therefore, development systems and web servers employing a business model that does not require security and compliance are the best candidates for public cloud computing.

Private Cloud

As the name suggests, the private cloud hosting environment caters to a single user. Your own personal computing residence, the private cloud provides your company with dedicated hardware and secure data storage capabilities that none of the center’s other clients can access. Security compliance standards are therefore easily achieved. An additional benefit is that the private cloud’s hardware, network and storage performance are also highly customizable.

This is a higher-end, more specialized service that aptly tends to cost more. Though you’re gaining many advantages over the public cloud, the resources provided in the private cloud are numerous and can potentially be under-utilized by smaller businesses. It’s also pertinent to consider many private clouds potentially require a contractual obligation.

As with any tech upgrade for your business, doing your due diligence is crucial to finding the solution that’s right for you.

How IBM Power Systems Are Challenging x86 Servers in the Corporate Data Center

Intel’s x86 architecture has long been dominant in the corporate server marketplace for good reason. Chips based on the x86 framework have been at the heart of personal computers and other devices for more than three decades, and a standardized, widely adopted infrastructure for development and support of x86-based products is in place. The head start x86 enjoys over any potential challengers is immense.

But that hasn’t stopped IBM from joining the fray.

In 2014, IBM sold its x86 server business to Lenovo and pinned its hopes for increasing its penetration of the enterprise and cloud server markets on its upgraded Power Systems line. At that time the consensus in the media and among competitors was that IBM’s efforts would be too little, too late. Intel’s x86 standard was simply too well entrenched to be displaced.

But that assessment is beginning to change. Servers based on the company’s Power8 RISC processor seem to be gathering momentum in the marketplace. In 2015, IBM’s financial results revealed that it had enjoyed revenue growth in its Power Systems line for the first time in four years.

Key to that growth, say analysts, was IBM’s decision to add Linux as an alternative to its proprietary AIX operating system. There are now thousands of ISVs (independent software vendors) developing new Power8 Linux applications or working to port existing x86-based Linux applications to the Power environment. And, IBM claims, it has demonstrated some very good reasons for its customers to do exactly that.

In a June, 2015 conference presentation, the company revealed certified benchmark test results showing that Power8 servers significantly outperformed x86 servers in running financial workloads. In fact, an IBM Power System 824 server more than doubled the performance of a best-in-class x86 machine.

Says Terry Keene, CEO of Integration Systems, LLC,

“Comparing the x86 and Power processors on a micro-benchmark level will show little raw performance advantages for either. Comparing the two using enterprise workloads will demonstrate a significant advantage for Power in data workloads such as databases, data warehouses, data transaction processing, data encryption/compression, and certainly in high-performance computing.”

IBM is aggressively pursuing its objective of gaining a double-digit share of the server market by 2020. And with its even more powerful Power9 chips due out in 2017, the company seems well positioned to reach that goal.

Why x86 Servers Continue to Dominate the Data Center

It wasn’t that long ago that there was a widespread expectation that x86-based servers would soon be displaced in corporate data centers, and in the cloud, by servers that use ARM processors. But so far, things haven’t turned out that way. Servers using x86 chips still maintain a more than 90 percent market share. As Intel spokesman William Moss notes, “There has been a lot of hype about ARM in the datacenter, but very few deployments.”

ARM chips, which are RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) processors, already dominate the mobile device market. They are widely used in such products as smartphones, laptops, and tablet computers. But their penetration of the server market has so far been minimal. And Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, thinks he knows why.

“What matters is all the infrastructure around the instruction set, and x86 has all that infrastructure,” Torvalds says. “Being compatible just wasn’t as big of a deal for the ARM ecosystem as it has been traditionally for the x86 ecosystem.”

In the world of Android-based mobile devices, the environment in which ARM chips have flourished, there is little standardization between manufacturers. Because the chipsets and hardware configurations of the various smartphones and tablets are unique to single products or product lines, the support infrastructure for ARM implementations is very fragmented. For example, it’s not possible to create a single Android update build that can be deployed across the devices of multiple manufacturers.

On the other hand, the x86 ecosystem has more than 30 years of development behind it, and standards are well understood and widely adhered to. That means it simply takes a lot less time and expense to develop and support x86 server environments than if ARM processors were used.

That’s not to say that the dominance of x86 in the data center is unassailable. IBM, for example, is making a determined effort to grab an increasing share of the server market with its own line of RISC processors, the Power8 and upcoming Power9 products.

But for the moment, x86 remains king of the data center realm.

Come back Thursday to read “How IBM Power Systems Are Challenging x86 Servers in the Corporate Data Center”.

The Move to Cloud Storage is Gathering Steam

Both large enterprises and smaller companies are well into a process of transitioning their data storage from on-premises data centers to the cloud. The advantages of cloud-based IT storage are compelling.

Advantages

First, cloud storage relieves a company of the necessity of up-front capital spending to purchase storage hardware. Cloud storage vendors store the data in their own remote data centers and charge a monthly fee for just the amount of storage a customer actually uses in that billing period.

Another advantage is that good cloud storage providers are experts in data management, data security, backups and disaster recovery. This takes a tremendous load off a customer’s in-house IT staff, which can then devote its attention to issues that are more focused on the company’s core businesses.

Concerns

One of the major concerns many IT managers have about moving to the cloud is the security of their data when it resides in someone else’s facilities. But that concern is being alleviated by two factors.

The first is that due to the nature of their business, cloud storage providers are necessarily extremely competent at protecting their clients’ data, and can usually do a better job of it than all but the largest companies can do on their own.

The second factor that mitigates concern about using cloud storage is that it’s not an all-or-nothing proposition. Many companies have settled on a hybrid solution that keeps their most business-critical data at home in their own data centers, while farming out less sensitive data to a cloud storage provider. Many times a cloud storage vendor actually implements and manages a private cloud on the customer’s premises. A survey by 451 Research indicates that by the end of 2014, 39 percent of enterprises had already moved to a hybrid solution.

Outlook

In 2015 spending by hardware manufacturers such as IBM on equipment destined for use in cloud data centers grew by 22 percent to almost $29 billion. According to IDC, spending on cloud infrastructure is expected to reach $37.5 billion by 2020.

As they become more familiar with the advantages of cloud computing, companies big and small are deciding that the cloud should be an integral part of their data storage infrastructure.

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